Campagnolo EKAR 1x13 new drivetrain

Gerard Vroomen - 24-Sep-2020
If you follow my posts, you may know I like 1x drivetrains. The front derailleur is such a primitive tool - two plates pushing against a chain until it falls off the chainring - that I find it slightly offensive. Compare that to the intricacies of a rear derailleur.

Anyway, I know there is a place for 2x drivetrains too, I just think in the future that place will be smaller as more and more cogs are added. When I ask people if they'll switch to 1x11 they may say no, but when I ask if they would switch to 1x13, almost everybody says yes. At some point, enough is enough and going 2x13 simply isn't necessary (never mind all the overlapping gears)



Well, today is the day, Campagnolo is introducing a 1x13 groups; EKAR. I am very happy that this group exists, and from such an unexpected source. You see, five years ago at Eurobike, Campagnolo gave me a preview of their first disc brake groupset. At that time, I told the engineer they should focus on 1x as they could make a real impact there. I also suggested they make a cassette that starts with a 9T cog. This makes it easier to have a good gear range without having jumps that are too big in the middle of the cassette.

In the years since, I asked every now and then if there was progress but I sort of lost hope. I even made a 9-32T cassette for the road because I didn't think anything would ever happen. Until 18 months ago when I was shown this EKAR groupset. Not only was it 1x, not only did it have a 9T cog to start but it also had 13 cogs, making it infinitely better than the 11-speed cassette I had done.

Now that it's in production I can say, it's a very nice groupset. My main take-aways are:
  • 1x is all about the cassette ratios and Campagnolo has got it right. They offer 3 options: 9-36T, 9-42T and 10-44T. I've been telling every drivetrain maker in the world that 380-440% range is the sweet spot for gravel (of course it depends on the strength of the rider and where they ride). So to have one cassette at 400% and another at 440% in this new EKAR group is a gift from heaven for me. And the 9-42 is even bigger than that, so great for extreme rides and thanks to the 13-speed, the steps are still reasonable.
  • It's mechanical. I have nothing against electronic drivetrains, but I also have nothing against mechanical shifting. you push the lever, it shifts. What more can you wish for? And of course if you go into the wild, you have a better chance to MacGyver a mechanical derailleur than an electronic one.
  • The parts are beautiful, as you would expect from Campagnolo. The rear derailleur, the carbon crank, all very nice.


If you fancy an EKAR build, the groupset is now available at retailers worldwide so just speak with your OPEN store to build up your WI.DE., U.P., U.P.P.E.R. or MIN.D. . There is one thing to note when ordering the EKAR brakes:


  • For the front brake on a U-Turn or R-Turn fork, you need to order the (140mm) EKAR brake caliper without any adaptors plus the 160mm brake rotor. That together will work perfectly on the fork. The offset is already in the fork so no need for the adaptor.
  • For the rear brake on an UP or UPPER, you need to order the (140mm) EKAR brake caliper plus the adaptor for the 160mm position plus the 160mm brake rotor. Alternatively you can put the (140mm) EKAR brake caliper on the frame without any adaptor and pair it with the 140mm brake rotor.
  • For the rear brake on a MIND or the WIDE, you need to order the (140mm) EKAR brake caliper without any adaptors plus the 160mm brake rotor. The offset created by the adaptor is already built into these frames, so the 140mm caliper matches automatically with the 160mm rotor.


The photos in this post are the personal WI.DE. bike of Campagnolo engineer Nicolo Martinello.

With the arrival of EKAR, you now have several nice drivetrain options:
  • If 1x12-speed is enough for you, SRAM Force/Eagle AXS gives you electronic shifting and massive gear ranges up to 520%.
  • If you want the most speeds in 1x and/or mechanical shifting, Campagnolo EKAR is your group.
  • 2x11 options come from Shimano with GRX, both mechanical and electronic.
  • For 2x12, our favorite is the Force AXS electronic groupset (best value for money) with the Max 36T rear derailleur and 10-36T cassette (up front we prefer the 46/33T chainrings).

Comments & Questions

OPEN
Is there a post mount option for the original Rapha UP?
Post #1 of 67. Posted by Tony on 24-Sep-2020 08:10:36 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22561]
OPEN
No, but there are adaptors available to put a flatmount brake on a postmount frame. A little clumsy but that does exist. At that point you may be better off selling your old bike and buying a new one though, the second-hand market is very strong nowadays.
Post #12 of 67. Posted by Gerard Vroomen on 24-Sep-2020 11:57:32 GMT in reply to post #1 [22561<--22573]
OPEN
What size chainrings do they make?
I can’t find any information in the web.
Post #2 of 67. Posted by CP on 24-Sep-2020 08:14:21 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22562]
OPEN
I have read even sizes from 38 to 44t.
Post #7 of 67. Posted by karlotta on 24-Sep-2020 09:14:36 GMT in reply to post #2 [22562<--22568]
OPEN
Indeed, 38-40-42-44T
Post #13 of 67. Posted by Gerard Vroomen on 24-Sep-2020 11:57:51 GMT in reply to post #2 [22562<--22574]
OPEN
Wow, this is a great new addition to the bike world. A serious option for a future build.
Post #3 of 67. Posted by Jannik on 24-Sep-2020 08:34:45 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22564]
OPEN
You completely forgot your AXS hack, using a 12-speed Rotor Cassette with AXS. These have a much better spread compared to SRAM cassettes. I am using that with complete satisfaction.
Post #4 of 67. Posted by Michiel Janssen on 24-Sep-2020 08:37:32 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22565]
OPEN
That wasn't really the topic of the blog :-)
Post #14 of 67. Posted by Gerard Vroomen on 24-Sep-2020 11:58:33 GMT in reply to post #4 [22565<--22575]
OPEN
Oh la la!
Post #5 of 67. Posted by Bengt Novik on 24-Sep-2020 08:41:23 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22566]
OPEN
Too nice. Slam dunk by Campagnolo. Design. Check, Functionality. Check. Looks. Check.
Post #6 of 67. Posted by Xaver on 24-Sep-2020 08:44:18 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22567]
OPEN
great post. do you know, if you can use third party narrow-wide chainrings on this goupset? thx, Stefan
Post #8 of 67. Posted by Stefan on 24-Sep-2020 10:14:37 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22569]
OPEN
I haven't seen anybody making one narrow enough yet.
Post #15 of 67. Posted by Gerard Vroomen on 24-Sep-2020 11:58:59 GMT in reply to post #8 [22569<--22576]
OPEN
Hi Gerard,
I like Campa very much from my old Bianchi times with the Nuovo Record group and I sympathize with the EKAR 1x13 group.
But what about the chain width and durability for a 13 ring casette?
Even the 11 compatible chain from SRAM has a quite limited life time unless you risk to exchange chain and the costly casette together because the new chain doesn't fit anymore with the used casette.
Are there any "endurance data" available?
Cheers,
Roland
Post #9 of 67. Posted by Roland on 24-Sep-2020 10:27:12 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22570]
OPEN
I have seen data but I am not sure what is public. I can say though that I am satisfied. Best to ask Campy if they publish the actual data, I have no idea (I rarely see manufacturers publish this other than in very general terms but you never know).
Post #16 of 67. Posted by Gerard Vroomen on 24-Sep-2020 12:00:44 GMT in reply to post #9 [22570<--22577]
OPEN
Oh My!! Now that is beautiful, functional, and Campy! My fav....!
Post #10 of 67. Posted by Jim Gomillion on 24-Sep-2020 10:40:31 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22571]
OPEN
is this group available right now? is it only available with Shamal wheels thus no option to build a wheel with a dynamo hub?
Post #11 of 67. Posted by Ray on 24-Sep-2020 11:56:27 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22572]
OPEN
The dynamo is in the front wheel right? The only proprietary thing you need for EKAR is the freehub body in the rear wheel. So not really a problem, but maybe you do need to ditch a front hub and some spokes out of a complete wheel. But some will start offering N3W free hubs as well, so I think eventually you'll be able to find what you need.
Post #17 of 67. Posted by Gerard Vroomen on 24-Sep-2020 12:02:05 GMT in reply to post #11 [22572<--22578]
OPEN
Thank you Gerard but is this groupies already available to order? The dynamo is indeed in the front wheel
Post #18 of 67. Posted by Ray on 24-Sep-2020 12:14:05 GMT in reply to post #17 [22578<--22579]
OPEN
Yes it is.
Post #19 of 67. Posted by Gerard Vroomen on 24-Sep-2020 12:25:51 GMT in reply to post #18 [22579<--22580]
OPEN
Reading your emphatic arguments for 1x and 400% GR, I am wondering what your position is on "true gems" = 1x drivetrains with internally geared hubs...
Post #20 of 67. Posted by Siggy on 24-Sep-2020 12:26:35 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22581]
OPEN
The only 1x that makes sense
Post #23 of 67. Posted by youpmelone on 24-Sep-2020 15:35:16 GMT in reply to post #20 [22581<--22584]
OPEN
If low maintenance and toughness are more important than weight and efficiency, they are a great solution.
Post #28 of 67. Posted by Gerard Vroomen on 24-Sep-2020 17:40:30 GMT in reply to post #20 [22581<--22589]
OPEN
Maybe time to ditch the UP with posted-mounted TRP HiRds / Potenza grouppo for this set-up and a new frame!
Post #21 of 67. Posted by JB on 24-Sep-2020 12:43:17 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22582]
OPEN
Are you guys going to sell an Ekar built wi.de?
Post #22 of 67. Posted by Jock deBoer on 24-Sep-2020 13:53:29 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22583]
OPEN
if the answer is a "yes", i would very strongly considering one!
Post #29 of 67. Posted by Robert Braun on 24-Sep-2020 18:55:06 GMT in reply to post #22 [22583<--22590]
OPEN
me too
Post #30 of 67. Posted by Jock deBoer on 24-Sep-2020 19:01:13 GMT in reply to post #29 [22590<--22591]
OPEN
wow - very promising product - thanks for the early announcement! I tried to get some more Info and it seems that the chainring in the offered group sets available till now is related to the related to the crank-arm length?
So, smallest with 40T only goes with a 170mm crank-arm? Is that early stage of a new product situation or what is behind?
And second, smallest chainring seems to be 40T - with a 9-42T I would not like to get higher than 36 or max 38T in the front...
or are there possibilities to mix with different group components?
Post #24 of 67. Posted by TA on 24-Sep-2020 16:18:52 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22585]
OPEN
Somebody else mentioned that, but in my OEM pricelist from Campy they have all chainrings (38-40-42-44) with all crank lengths (165-170-172.5-175). And I know for a fact that they are already producing the 38T with all four crank lengths at least for OEM. For the chainring you cannot mix with other Campy groups as you need the narrow-wide design and only EKAR has that.
Post #46 of 67. Posted by Gerard Vroomen on 26-Sep-2020 16:13:19 GMT in reply to post #24 [22585<--22613]
OPEN
There is a lot of bias in the piece above, which is fine since it is your opinion and your commercial website, however it might leave a good part of the the Open UP clients out in the cold. 1x is still is a solution searching for a problem, 12 speed or 13 speed. The whole idea of on UP was to have one bike which can do all. And for that a 400% range is definitely too small.

The best groupset out there currently is Shimano GRX Di2, the new upcoming Dura Ace shows that.. It's trickle up time.
I have all main versions of shimano groups DI2, and some of them are prototypes, as I do have the RED AXS.

Best setup currently, road and gravel:
Shifters and brakes GRX (unparalleled brake modulation)
Dura Ace Crank, 50 /34
10-42 / 11-40 / 11-46 (yes it works perfectly) cassette
RX817 rear der (no typo), it works better and faster than the 815
chain length: large large minus 1.5 (chain length is crucial)
try 12 speed shimano
dura ace fd
Program synchro shifting to avoid the 2 largest cassette cogs while on the big ring (or largest 3 when using the 11-46)
(go from 3rd largest to 5th largest when down shifting to 34) (the programming is stored in the battery so use any dura ace / ultegra rd to program the synchro shift and then swap)

640% range, perfect shifting, never dropping a chain.
If you're going for a 5 to 10 hour ride exploring new gravel roads.. in the Alps, the dolomites, the Jura, Schwarzwald, California, Andes.. 640% is a no brainer. with the added bonus op far superior breaking, ergonomics etc there is no facts based reason to go 1x, and def not AXS.



Mechanical vs Electric.
Looking up DI2stats i see a shift around a 1000 times per 2.5 to 3 hours a very undulating parcours.
that solves the discussion Mechanical vs Electric.

If you hate walking with a bike, or if you are very careful with your knees GRX Di2 2x in the above setup it is..
Post #25 of 67. Posted by youpmelone on 24-Sep-2020 16:35:54 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22586]
OPEN
Thank you ! We are drinking from the same gravy boat.
Post #32 of 67. Posted by Jeff Vader on 25-Sep-2020 00:21:47 GMT in reply to post #25 [22586<--22594]
OPEN
I like how what you like is what everyone else should like. Hold onto that 2x stuff because like rim brakes it'll be a memory for off road use in a few years. Overlapping gears and 640% percent gear spread, two things I certainly don't need.
Post #33 of 67. Posted by Jeff on 25-Sep-2020 01:06:26 GMT in reply to post #25 [22586<--22595]
OPEN
It is not about like, it is about facts. Everyone can like what they want. Bike riding is about emotion, I love my titanium bike, will never state it is better because based on facts it simple is way less aero and stiff. Still love riding it. 640% has nothing to do with overlapping. It is about the range = do you have a big enough gear to support you in a 20km downhill at 3%, or do you have a small enough gear to get up the mountain at 15% average on gravel for 3 hrs.

1x is superior for the bike manufacturers, less components, less manufacturing steps, less testing, less planning, less costs, higher margin.
Facts based, it isnt superior for the user of the bike.
Post #34 of 67. Posted by youpmelone on 25-Sep-2020 04:36:14 GMT in reply to post #33 [22595<--22596]
OPEN
Lots of emotion in your facts. The fact is, most riders don't need 640% range. If you do, great, but most don't. They are perfectly happy with a 380% or 420% or 500% range for where THEY ride. If that's not enough for you is fine, then go with something else. But just because you need 640% for where you want to ride with your setup and your legs and your engine, doesn't mean everybody does. Why do people need the gears to ride in places they'll never go?

Also, your idea about less cost and higher margin is also demonstrably false. With many drivetrains, the delta is quite small (1x cassette and chainring are more expensive) and with many bikes, their 1x versions are offered for less than the 2x versions. I'm the last to say "the market fixes everything" but hte bike market with its 100's of brands is so price competitive that you can't make a bigger margin on a 1x bike than a 2x bike because one of the other brands will jump into that hole.
Post #35 of 67. Posted by Gerard Vroomen on 25-Sep-2020 10:30:00 GMT in reply to post #34 [22596<--22598]
OPEN
"Lots of emotion in your facts", :-)) Not much, wouldnt know where. Di2stats shows exactly in which gears i spend the most time, and pre corona i would ride all over the world so I have a pretty good overview of what you need where. Granted, most is hilly or mountainous.

"They are perfectly happy with a 380% or 420% or 500% range for where THEY ride."
that's ok. But perfectly happy doesn't mean better, it means they dont know what they miss, or compromise because there is no other way, or they really don't need it.

If you have a "One Bike can do all" bike then why would you reduce your range for no benefit?

I still dont know what problem 1x solves on a roadframe.. unless you like walking, or never get on new "open" roads which is even more sad..
Post #36 of 67. Posted by youpmelone on 25-Sep-2020 13:36:08 GMT in reply to post #35 [22598<--22599]
OPEN
The problem that 1x specifically addresses for me is chainsuck, when you ride those "open" roads in all conditions. It can, and does, happen with brand new components and the results are never pretty.

A 1x specific frame design, per the Open WI.DE., also permits the use of wider tyres.
Post #55 of 67. Posted by John B. on 28-Sep-2020 11:24:19 GMT in reply to post #36 [22599<--22634]
OPEN
I've seen youtube videos about chainsuck but i never actually experienced it (neither on sram, shimano 9 to 11 speed mtb or road)
I've had my mtb cleats and shoes so dirty that i could not clip in, another reason why i hate getting off the bike and walk..
But is chainsuck really is a major issue it is the first time i read an actual benefit of 1x.
(however for me that would be instantly offsetted by the dropping of the chain which is rather inconvenient, and makes carbon frames less pretty.. )
Post #56 of 67. Posted by youpmelone on 29-Sep-2020 07:07:52 GMT in reply to post #55 [22634<--22635]
OPEN
Wet, gritty dirt roads are very effective at causing chainsuck and it is a major issue where I cycle most, in New England. I'm unclear what "dropping of the chain" you are referring to, however.
Post #57 of 67. Posted by John B. on 29-Sep-2020 12:52:33 GMT in reply to post #56 [22635<--22636]
OPEN
This drivetrain looks just lovely, like what SRAM should have released on the mechanical front but won't. Kudos for Campy!
Post #26 of 67. Posted by Ron Reed on 24-Sep-2020 16:44:15 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22587]
OPEN
My mechanical Force 1x is so 2016 now.
Post #27 of 67. Posted by Mike on 24-Sep-2020 16:57:26 GMT in reply to post #26 [22587<--22588]
OPEN
Is it possible to use a Rotor 1X DM crank and chain ring with this group. Or does one need to wait until Rotor makes Campy specific rings?
Post #31 of 67. Posted by Adrian Engel on 24-Sep-2020 20:36:33 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22592]
OPEN
I think the 13-sp Rotor rings are a bit thicker than the Campagnolo 13-sp rings.
Post #37 of 67. Posted by Gerard Vroomen on 25-Sep-2020 17:13:43 GMT in reply to post #31 [22592<--22600]
OPEN
Can I direct buy from this site and have the bike delivered to my home ?.
Cheers
Post #38 of 67. Posted by Mat on 26-Sep-2020 00:38:18 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22601]
OPEN
We sell the framesets and a complete Force/Eagle bike online: https://opencyc...rame. For complete EKAR bikes, you can spec those with any of the OPEN retailers: https://opencyc...tobuy
Post #41 of 67. Posted by Gerard Vroomen on 26-Sep-2020 11:18:30 GMT in reply to post #38 [22601<--22608]
OPEN
ooouuuuuuhhh yeahhhhhhhhhhhhh!!!
Campagnolo 100% !!!! Love it!
Post #39 of 67. Posted by Sg on 26-Sep-2020 06:15:03 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22603]
OPEN
A question; which front chainring is optimal for Ekar? They list 38t, 40t, and 42t in 170, 172.5, 175. I have a medium frame WI DE and run 172.5 on road bike. I was thinking the gravel speed cassette. Also, will one need the almighty campy chain tool because quick links are not compatible? And for rear freehub the NW3? Which wheel set? Thanks Gerard!
Post #40 of 67. Posted by Alan Montgomery on 26-Sep-2020 11:13:22 GMT in reply to post #39 [22603<--22605]
OPEN
Not sure what they list where but in principle all 4 chainring sizes are available with all 4 crank lengths. The best chainring depends on your strength, terrain and the cassette you pick, I can't possibly give you a number. but I doubt that many need the 44T, in fact I think the chainrings are a bit on the large side and I would like to see at least a 36T as well. I told them this a while ago too but I can't comment on if/when that will happen.

There is a quick link option now on the chain. There are several manufacturers offering N3W wheel sets, the free hub bodies are retrofittable on some wheels too.
Post #42 of 67. Posted by Gerard Vroomen on 26-Sep-2020 11:22:07 GMT in reply to post #40 [22605<--22609]
OPEN
Thank you! I will probably go with the 38t. Was thinking the SRAM groupset but the campag offering in mechanical as you say will not leave you stranded. I have no experience with electronic. I know the quick link is always a contested topic by mechanics and owners of Record and SR. Some say peening is the only correct way to ensure proper chain performance on the narrower 11/12 speed chains? Thanks Gerard! Am excited to get this bike built.
Post #43 of 67. Posted by Alsn Montgomery on 26-Sep-2020 11:50:36 GMT in reply to post #42 [22609<--22610]
OPEN
Of course the odds of being stranded is obviously quite small, and the odds of it happening in an area with zero support a small percentage of that. So for most people not a decisive point, but probably neither are any other between electronic and mechanical.
Post #44 of 67. Posted by Gerard Vroomen on 26-Sep-2020 12:11:55 GMT in reply to post #43 [22610<--22611]
OPEN
Thanks! If you were to decide today on which way to go with the WI DE SRAM groupset or Ekar, which would you choose? I will take that as an expert advice ????
Post #45 of 67. Posted by Alsn Montgomery on 26-Sep-2020 14:55:05 GMT in reply to post #44 [22611<--22612]
OPEN
They're both nice, I don't think you can go either way and not be very happy. I wouldn't worry about that choice, really. In the end your tire choice will probably have a bigger impact.
Post #49 of 67. Posted by Gerard Vroomen on 27-Sep-2020 09:21:24 GMT in reply to post #45 [22612<--22625]
OPEN
Hi Gerard, could you please specify which cassette and which crankset sizes are mounted on the bike shown above from Campa engineer Nicola Martinello. Many thanks, Christian
Post #47 of 67. Posted by Christian on 26-Sep-2020 19:16:21 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22616]
OPEN
That's a 9-42T cassette and 38T chainring.
Post #48 of 67. Posted by Gerard Vroomen on 27-Sep-2020 09:13:17 GMT in reply to post #47 [22616<--22624]
OPEN
Oh wow! An U.P.P.E.R. with an Ekar group would probably be the closest thing to the perfect bike. Just one question though, is it not possible to use 140mm Ekar-rotors on an U.P./U.P.P.E.R.? Why is that? Sorry for the noob question :)
Post #50 of 67. Posted by Anders on 27-Sep-2020 18:07:41 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22627]
OPEN
For the rear, you can put a 140mm caliper and 140mm rotor without any adaptors onto the frame. for the front, you can only mount a 160mm rotor and you need the 140mm caliper without adaptors to do it.
Post #53 of 67. Posted by Gerard Vroomen on 28-Sep-2020 05:58:44 GMT in reply to post #50 [22627<--22631]
OPEN
Ok, thought so. Thanx :)
Post #54 of 67. Posted by Anders on 28-Sep-2020 07:53:23 GMT in reply to post #53 [22631<--22632]
OPEN
Hi Gerard,
how will this group go with my brand new (just bought them 2 weeks ago) Zipp 303 Firecrest wheels? Do you think it will come in electronic?
Post #51 of 67. Posted by Michael Heenan on 27-Sep-2020 20:49:57 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22628]
OPEN
Well, you'd need to get a N3W free hub for the zipp wheel. I am not sure if that exists yet (I assume not since zipp is owned by SRAM and I doubt Campagnolo gave SRAM advance warning of the upcoming EKAR). But Zipp might start to produce that freehub, you'd need to ask them.

About EKAR in electronic, you'd have to ask Campagnolo. I can never comment on what drivetrain makers have in the pipeline, otherwise they wouldn't tell us anything (and so my reluctance to answer is in no way an indication of what the answer would be).
Post #52 of 67. Posted by Gerard Vroomen on 28-Sep-2020 05:03:43 GMT in reply to post #51 [22628<--22630]
OPEN
Can the chain be used in a 2x setup?
Post #58 of 67. Posted by Harry on 30-Sep-2020 01:24:01 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22637]
OPEN
I don't think so, it's super narrow so it would get stuck on the thicker 2x12 teeth.
Post #60 of 67. Posted by Gerard Vroomen on 30-Sep-2020 09:02:19 GMT in reply to post #58 [22637<--22639]
OPEN
Ok, but does Campy, or another manufacturer, has plans to produce thin chainrings that could be used in a 2 x setup?
If yes, do you think that the chain would work there?
BTW what is the thickness of the chainrings?
Post #62 of 67. Posted by Harry on 30-Sep-2020 09:47:33 GMT in reply to post #60 [22639<--22641]
OPEN
If your question is whether you could make a 2x13 setup the answer is no, the rear derailleur wouldn't have the capacity to take up the extra chain slack from the front chainring difference.
Post #63 of 67. Posted by Gerard Vroomen on 30-Sep-2020 10:28:05 GMT in reply to post #62 [22641<--22642]
OPEN
Thx, was looking for the derailleur capacity, could find it. Can you advise?
Post #64 of 67. Posted by Harry on 30-Sep-2020 11:38:00 GMT in reply to post #63 [22642<--22643]
OPEN
They don't really specify but it's specific to shift up to the 10-44 cassette so that would mean the capacity is 34T. And even that doesn't mean you could run the 9-36T with two chainrings that are only 7T difference, it still may not work.
Post #66 of 67. Posted by Gerard Vroomen on 30-Sep-2020 16:35:56 GMT in reply to post #64 [22643<--22645]
OPEN
What's the issue with the Campagnolo and Shimano derailleurs, why does the cable need to enter from behind and do a huge loop in the open, waiting for any branch and rock to catch it? I doubt the cable outer is effective for changing the direction of the cable, and will get worn much faster than a straight cable.
Post #59 of 67. Posted by Ivo Roylev on 30-Sep-2020 06:25:19 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22638]
OPEN
OK - now you've given me a difficult problem. Do I go for the MIN.D. with EKAR or the 3T Strada with the same? Seriously, I've lost sleep over the past couple of days. I know you'll say [accurately] that I would be delighted either way, but what do you see as the differences? I'm in Canada and I think availability is about the same.
Post #61 of 67. Posted by Fred Newton on 30-Sep-2020 09:08:59 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22640]
OPEN
Don't lose sleep over it. They are very different bikes although of course they can do the same thing, ride comfortably on roads even if they're rough. The MIN.D. focuses a bit more on comfort for the frame shapes, the MIN.D. on aerodynamics. That's it.
Post #65 of 67. Posted by Gerard Vroomen on 30-Sep-2020 16:33:20 GMT in reply to post #61 [22640<--22644]
OPEN
Any recommendations on a tire to max out on the Wi.de? 650b and 700c.
Post #67 of 67. Posted by Jock deBoer on 21-Oct-2020 10:26:22 GMT in reply to blog [0<--22703]
Content
From:
To: